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Heard Museum Current Exhibitions

Known for its award-winning exhibits, the Heard Museum uses its collections and first-person voice to tell the stories of American Indian cultures while at the same time celebrates the diverse achievements of today's artists. Experience the Heard's 11 exhibition galleries that include both ongoing shows and changing exhibits that feature an array of artists and art forms.

Signature Exhibit  
   

HOME: NATIVE PEOPLE IN THE SOUTHWEST
Artist voices combine with more than 2,000 of the museum's finest pieces to tell the stories -- past and present -- of Southwestern Native people. See a spectacular display of Hopi katsina dolls from the Sen. Barry Goldwater and Fred Harvey Company collections. A Navajo hogan, four video presentations, interactive sound and video stations, a media room and frequent artist demonstrations make this a must-see. Free guided tours.
Changing Exhibits  
   
   

 

 

 

CHOCOLATE, CHILI & COCHINEAL: CHANGING TASTE AROUND THE WORLD

On display through Nov. 30, 2014

Chocolate joins many other delectably displayed depictions of foods in the Heard’s presentation about several edibles many people might be surprised to know are from the Americas.

The exhibit explores foods — chili, tomatoes, potatoes, peanuts, avocados, maple syrup, corn, beans, squash — and a tiny insect, the cochineal, indigenous to the Americas that when exported greatly affected other parts of the world.

Sixteenth-century Spanish conquistadors guarded the source of the brilliant red dye derived from cochineal, the tiny insect that feeds on prickly pear cactus. Cochineal was used in historic Navajo textiles and santos from Northern New Mexico, including La Divina Pastora (left) by Charles M. Carrillo (b. 1956).

 

   

   

Gilcrease Ledger Artist (Cheyenne),“Women Honoring Warriors,”

c. 1880 Pencil, paper. Bequest of Carolann Smurthwaite.

This exhibit is generously supported by

 

STORIES OUTSIDE THE LINES:

AMERICAN INDIAN LEDGER ART

Opening March 29, 2014;

on display through Sept. 21, 2014

Ledger book drawing began in the late 19th century when several tribes of the Great Plains were relocated by the U.S. government. Many of their cultures had traditions of recording events on animal hides using natural pigments.

Confined to a reservation or faced with imprisonment, Indians turned to the materials they had available to them – ledger books and pencils, provided by traders and government agents – to record events and past achievements in their lives.

This exhibit has been expanded from its original 2012-13 showing at the Heard Museum North Scottsdale.

 

   

Allan Houser (Chiricahua Apache), (1914-1994) , "War Pony,"

1978. Bequest of Ann B. Ritt.

 

THE HOUSER/HAOZOUS FAMILY: CELEBRATING A CENTURY

On display through April 26, 2015

The descendants of Sam and Blossom Haozous -- Allan Houser (1914-1994), the centennial of whose birth also gives rise to this exhibit, and Houser's sons Bob and Phillip Haozous -- tell the stories of their experiences and their Chiricahua Warm Springs Apache heritage through their art.

Part of the centennial recognition is the commemoration of 100 years of freedom for the Chiricahua Apache, who had been held as prisoners of war after their surrender in 1886 and relocated to Florida, then Alabama and finally Oklahoma.

   
ELEGANCE FROM EARTH: HOPI POTTERY
New closing date: April 6, 2014

This exhibit features families of Hopi potters, who often learn pottery techniques from elders and share designs. These superlative artists truly create elegance from earth. Potters with artworks on display in the exhibit include Nampeyo, Helen Naha and Joy Navasie, among others.

   
Ongoing Exhibits  
   
   
Indian Board School REMEMBERING OUR INDIAN SCHOOL DAYS:  THE BOARDING SCHOOL EXPERIENCE
REMEMBERING OUR INDIAN SCHOOL DAYS: THE BOARDING SCHOOL EXPERIENCE
Few people realize that American Indians were forced by the federal government to attend residential boarding schools located hundreds of miles from home. This powerful exhibit immerses visitors into the story, which draws on first-person recollections, memorabilia and the writings and art of four generations of Indian School alumni.
              

                    

 

AMERICAN INDIAN VETERANS

NATIONAL MEMORIAL

Service and sacrifice spanning more than three centuries are honored in the first and only known national memorial to American Indian veterans of many conflicts, here on the Phoenix campus of the Heard Museum. The Memorial contains 120 feet of concrete walls up to 15 feet tall bearing several panels describing the devotion of American Indian warriors to their country. Highlights also include the heroic bronze sculpture "Unconquered II" by Chiricahua Apache artist Allan Houser (1914-1994) and two sculptures by Santa Clara Pueblo artist Michael Naranjo.

See a page of photos from the American Indian Veterans National Memorial's November 14, 2012, dedication ceremony.

 

 

We Are! Arizona's First People
WE ARE! ARIZONA'S FIRST PEOPLE
Located in the Ullman Learning Center, this exhibit is the only gallery display in the state to include all 21 of Arizona’s federally recognized tribal communities. In their own voices, Arizona’s Native cultures explain their histories, cultures and futures. Children and kids-at-heart will love the interactive and hands-on take-home activities.
EVERY PICTURE TELLS A STORY
Explore seven regions and see how American Indian artists reflect their environments in their artwork in this interactive gallery perfect for families. Spot the different wildlife and vegetation illustrated in the artwork, then try your hand at making a hummingbird, bandolier bag, Northwest Coast button blanket, bow guard or Inuit felt design. It's fun for everyone!
AROUND THE WORLD: THE HEARD MUSEUM COLLECTION
Tour the global span of the Heard’s collection with this exhibition of artwork by Native peoples of North and South America, Africa and Oceania. The exhibit features work collected by Dwight and Maie Heard and other significant donors, like Byron Harvey III, whose gifts have played a key role in shaping the museum’s collection.
History & Collections of the Heard Museum

HISTORY & COLLECTIONS OF THE HEARD MUSEUM
Maie and Dwight Heard's dream of sharing the beauty of their private collection with the public was realized in 1929 when the Heard Museum opened its doors. Today, the Heard's 40,000-object collection includes traditional work with an emphasis on the cultures of the greater Southwest as well as American Indian fine art from throughout North America.

 

N. Scott Momaday (Kiowa), b. 1934, "Ancestral Voice,"

1979, acrylic on canvas. Collection of the artist.

 

N. SCOTT MOMADAY: ART & POETRY

In addition to being a Pulitzer Prize-winning author and playright, N. Scott Momaday (Kiowa) is an artist who has illustrated many of his books and poetry. The Heard presents this unique exhibit, which pairs Momaday's paintings and monoprints with selections from his writing to create a powerful blend of the two.

 
Upcoming Exhibits
   
   

Darren Vigil Gray (Jicarilla Apache), b. 1959, "Motherland of Basketmakers #16," 2011, acryclic on canvas. Gift of Maxine and Stuart Applebaum.


THAT'S THE WAY I LIKE IT!

Opening April 26, 2014;

on display through Feb. 8, 2015

With the help of visitors like you, the Heard has selected a group of artworks -- which included the painting at left -- to create a wonderful collection of our most recent contemporary acquisitions. The donated items were given to the museum by varied collectors who recognized each artist’s ability to transform and create a work of art, and your votes have helped to curate and create the final exhibit.

We'll be announcing the selected artworks soon. Watch this space!

 

   

  BUILD! logo by Kelsey Hage

 

BUILD! TOY BRICK ART

AT THE HEARD

Opening May 24, 2014;

on display through Sept. 28, 2014

LEGO ® bricks, the popular building toy, are the building blocks of intense creativity and design among adults and children alike. This family-friendly, interactive exhibition will feature local American Indian and non-American Indian artists transforming their artworks using the popular construction toys. Interactive activities combined with the assembled artworks will make art accessible to both children and adults while showing the amazing features of form, color and design that LEGO bricks provide. A series of weeklong children's workshops in June and other family events in July and August compelement the exhibit.

This exhibit is generously supported by a grant from the Virginia Ullman Foundation.


LEGO® is a trademark of the LEGO Group,
which does not sponsor, authorize or
endorse this exhibit.

 

Left: Sean Kenney, "Bicycle Trumps Traffic," 2011, built with 93,407 LEGO brick pieces.

   
   



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